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This stunning 1925 Hollywood Heights Tudor at 6932 Santa Monica Drive is so spectacular, it was featured in the 2013 Hollywood Heights Neighborhood home tour. But life wasn’t all glamour for this adorable Tudor angel. It’s very hard to imagine, but once upon a time she stood vacant for two years. A family of raccoons even had to be evicted when the home was purchased by the present owners. Originally a duplex, the owners, both former architects, had a clear vision of the property’s potential. Working together with Perrin Scudder, of Scudder Construction, they created a wonderful single family home with immaculate style and grace, and retained the charm of the era.

Of course, they introduced modern functionality where it was needed. The result is an amazingly modern home with the bones and charm of yesteryear.

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Bowman ext

Wow, this is something we have not really seen. But how interesting! Show the home in two different colors. Is it red, is it beige, who knows? Maybe it’s BOTH!

(Or maybe you just need new glasses?)Bowman beigeThe house at 9951 Bowman Blvd. was listed as being in Preston Hollow. Yes, Preston Hollow indeed — west of Marsh Lane, east of Webb’s Chapel Road. No fooling, that was what it said on Trulia, those smarties!

9951 Bowman Blvd is in the Preston Hollow neighborhood in Dallas, TX. The average list price for Preston Hollow is $1,028,310.

Let’s tell them Andy Beal and George W. Bush are right next door! (more…)

Marc Fornes

Louis Vuitton Pop-Up Store in London, designed by architect Marc Fornes. Photo: Stephane Muratet

Brooklyn-based architect, artist, and digital thinker Marc Fornes is the speaker at the next Dallas Architecture Forum event March 29.

Marc Fornes

Marc Fornes

Fornes is the founder of THEVERYMANY™, a New York-based studio engaging art and architecture through systematic research and development into applied computer science and digital fabrication. Fornes creates complex, curvilinear self-supported structures located in France, Canada, and the United States. His work is in the permanent collections of the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the FRAC Centre in Orleans, France, and in many private collections. He has created private residences and pop-up stores for such well-known designers as Louis Vuitton and Irene Neuwirth.

He is also TED Fellow and has been a speaker at multiple events and institutions, including the ArchiLab symposium and MoMA MIND. Together with Francois Roche, he co-created “(n)Certainties,” a graduate studio course at Columbia University, the University of Southern California, and Die Angewandte in Vienna.

Fornes is currently teaching at Princeton and Harvard Graduate School of Design. With his diverse background in architecture, design, computation, digital fabrication, and education, Fornes’ presentation is sure to be valuable for the Dallas community.

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The “tiny house” movement, as well as eco-villages, co-housing, and pocket neighborhoods, are some of the responses to urban growth.

Nan Ellin

Nan Ellin

People living in these alternative houses are returning to a simpler way of life. These all incorporate shared amenities and social spaces, encouraging human interaction in order to nourish a deep sense of community. There’s less “stuff” to stress about, a smaller footprint, and fewer wasted resources.

The next Dallas Architecture Forum event is a panel discussion with residents, architects, and developers of such projects. They will explore their successes as well as opportunities for the future in an evening titled Village Redux: Co-Housing and Pocket Neighborhoods.

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mayrath house

Original Geneva cabinets are just one of the Midcentury Modern wonders in the iconic Mayrath house, located at 10707 Lennox Ln. in Northwest Dallas near the Straight Lane estates.

For all of its progress toward becoming a world-class city, Dallas still has a lot to learn about the value of historic architecture.

We are tear-down happy. The list of demolished Dallas buildings with significant historic and architectural value would go on for pages. But here are a few recent examples:

We might have another situation happening now. The Mayrath house at 10707 Lennox Ln. is a Midcentury Modern gem. It was designed by Dallas architect and homebuilder Truett A. Bishop in 1956, and is largely unchanged since then.

Photo: Michael Amonett

Photo: Michael Amonett

A Dallas Times Herald article from Sept. 23, 1957, titled Not a Splinter of Wood Used In Outstanding Home in Dallas, describes the Mayrath House like this:

Wood, the most frequently used material in homes, is completely shunned in the home of one Dallas family. There isn’t so much as a splinter of wood in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Mayrath, 10707 Lennox Lane…Built on columns of steel, the two story house is constructed with aluminum, glass, concrete and Austin stone. It may look like a country club at first glance, but it is a luxury home—one that probably is not equaled in the vast Southwest.

In terms of architectural value, this Northwest Dallas home near Royal Lane and Inwood Road is priceless. But it was listed Jan. 18 by Sharon Quist with Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate for $2.5 million, which is just the lot value.

That means the iconic Mayrath house and all its Midcentury significance is likely to face the wrecking ball, probably replaced by another generic McMansion or faux château.

When discussing this possible fate for the Mayrath house, a friend commented, “That is so Dallas.” But it doesn’t have to be. This home is worth saving.

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Bob Harris, FAIA, LEED Fellow, Lake|Flato Architects

Bob Harris, FAIA, LEED Fellow, Lake|Flato Architects

Millennials are a generation 68 million strong in the United States, and their interest in socially responsible and sustainable design and architecture is huge.

The next Dallas Architecture Forum event is a panel discussion called The Social Initiative, focusing on this group of Americans born between 1981 and 1996. Moderated by Bob Harris, this panel will look at why Millennials care less about ego, form, or aesthetics in architecture and design, and more about the needs and experiences of people and bridging boundaries among disciplines, demographics, and neighborhoods.

Harris a partner and lead for the Eco-Conservation studio for Lake|Flato Architects in San Antonio. He has more than 20 years of project experience combining award-winning design with sustainable solutions. His work with environmental issues ranges from land preservation advocacy to sustainable urban design. Harris is joined by three panelists:

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31-London-Street-skyscraper-by-Renzo-Piano8-thumb

As Curbed points out, 2015 was a very good year for starchitect Renzo Piano, what with the opening of the Whitney Museum and his inclusion in the final round of firms submitting for the Obama Presidential Library.

Piano is, of course, the architect of our own Nasher Sculpture Center, which claims neighbor Museum Tower is threatening artworks in the galleries, burning the plants in the center’s garden and blinding visitors with its glare. For years both parties have been trying to find a solution, but that all stopped last August. Piano has said it would be “impossible” for the museum building to make adjustments to offset the glare.

But he is having a bit of karmatic trouble lately in London, “where his plan for a 72-story skyscraper there, nicknamed the Tube, has been withdrawn due to pressure from locals and protests against the larger development,” according to Curbed. Complaint: it’s too tall and may impose on neighboring developments. The renovation of Paddington Station in West London would have included 200,000 feet of office spaces, restaurants and shops. Developer Irvine Sellar is a huge Piano fan: he previously worked with Piano to develop The Shard, London’s tallest tower and the anchor of another ambitious development. Shard II The Tube was expected to cost up to £600 million ($927 million). But this is an ouch: The Architects’ Journal headline reads: “Piano’s Paddington Pole pulled from planning. (more…)

One of the architectural gems in Dallas is Fair Park, a 277-acre recreational and educational complex southeast of downtown Dallas. It is home to many George Dahl-designed Art Deco buildings constructed for the Texas Centennial Exposition in 1936, and is registered as a Dallas Landmark and National Historic Landmark.

Mark Lamster

Mark Lamster

But this park, home to the Texas State Fair each fall, is underperforming the rest of the year.

The next Dallas Architecture Forum event will address “Making Fair Park Work,” a panel discussion moderated by Dallas Morning News architecture critic Mark Lamster, who is also a professor in the College of Architecture Planning and Public Affairs (CAPPA) at the University of Texas at Arlington.

The main question will be, “how can Dallas transform Fair Park into a year-round destination and economic engine for its South Dallas area?” The city is now faced with several options for its redevelopment, and must choose the best path forward.

“The Dallas Architecture Forum is pleased to present this next panel in its 2015-16 series of thought-provoking panel discussions on topics impacting the citizens of Dallas both locally and globally,” said forum executive director Nate Eudaly. “Moderator Mark Lamster will be joined by a panel of well-respected community leaders to discuss this extremely important topic. The result will be engaging and thought-provoking discussions for our attendees.”

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