mansion park

The choice to move to Oak Lawn is one often based on location. People who enjoy this neighborhood with Turtle Creek, hoards of excellent dining and shopping options, and plenty of nightlife, aren’t planning to spend oodles of time inside their digs. Life in Oak Lawn is to be lived in the neighborhood itself, right? 

That’s why we find this adorable Bud Oglesby-designed, Midcentury Modern condo listed by Keller Williams Urban agent Don Neilson so appealing. As our High Caliber Home of the Week presented by Lisa Peters of Caliber Home Loans, we see the inherent value in such a superb location — Mansion Park. Plus, its modest floor plan is so incredibly functional that you won’t miss all the excess space you left behind.

“This is the ultimate ‘tiny home’ on steroids,” Neilson said of his listing at 2727 Hood Street, Unit No. 110. “Today’s sophisticated urban buyers want convenience, style, and simplicity. They want to live in a nice neighborhood and they want a home that is affordable, so they spend their free time on living a more fulfilling lifestyle.”

We couldn’t agree more! 

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Mansion ParkTwo blocks from Turtle Creek, Katy Trail, and the Uptown shopping and dining, when we saw that this sleek, sexy, and elegant Mansion Park townhome in our Instagram feed this week, we knew we had to share.

And lo and behold, we’ve shared before. Last year, Candy fell hard for this three-bedroom, three-and-a-half bath, three-story home, with good reason. Secluded behind a treeline, wall, and a gate, 3625 Brown Street is both private and right in the middle of everything.

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Enjoy Elevated Elegance in Mansion Park with this Listing from Clay Stapp | CandysDirt.com

You’ll find elevated elegance in one of Dallas’ finest neighborhoods with one modern townhome that exceeds expectations on every level.

Located in Mansion Park, the townhome at 3625 Brown St. rises up from the ground, as if chiseled from the stone with which it was created. The craftsmanship, aesthetic, and finish-out are luxurious and sophisticated.

“Mansion Park borders Turtle Creek, Oak Lawn, and Uptown and is just minutes from downtown Dallas — this is an incredible location,” said Clay Stapp of CLAY STAPP+CO, who has co-listed this property with Natalie Newberry. “This townhome is exceptional, from the well-appointed communal spaces and rooftop deck, to the original art installations by Luis Olinto — there’s just nothing else like it on the market.”

This home has three bedrooms, three full bathrooms, one half bath, three living areas, two dining areas, and 3,734 square feet on three stories. There’s an open house this Sunday, Sept. 30, from 2-4 p.m. Want a sneak peek?

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The Mansion Park area is one of those neighborhoods chock-full of great properties, and these townhomes are a perfect example of how you can get into a fabulous neighborhood for a less-than-exorbitant price. While these Bud Oglesby-designed, midcentury modern townhomes look pitch perfect from the curb, 2812 Welborn St., another amazing listing from Ebby Halliday top-performer Dennis Hammet, truly does this design justice.

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Italian Renaissance Mansion

When I saw this Kessler Park Italian Renaissance mansion, I did a double take. I was pretty darned sure I’d been in it years ago. Indeed, it was a sought-after photography location when I was a photo stylist. There is a very big reason photographers and filmmakers loved shooting here.

It transports you back to the Roaring ‘20s. If they were to remake The Great Gatsby in Dallas, this would be the perfect location. This house represents the plush, wildly successful years of the 1920s, and not a lot of these homes remain.

Listing agent David Griffin wrote the following about this incredible Kessler Park Italian Renaissance mansion at 1177 Lausanne Avenue.

“Often referred to as ‘The Kessler Mansion,’ this circa 1925 Great Gatsby showplace is one of the signature homes in Kessler Park,” he said.

It’s perhaps not a coincidence that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel about the Roaring ’20s and this Italian Renaissance-inspired home both made their debut the same year. If there were ever a home built in Dallas in the 1920s that exemplifies the prosperity and exuberance of that era, this mansion remains one of the finest examples. On over .8 an acre, the beautifully proportioned façade is framed by two elegantly designed loggias with arched columns. With over 6,450 square feet and extensive grounds, a home like this rarely comes on the market in Dallas.

Italian Renaissance Mansion

Italian Renaissance Mansion

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Georgian mansion

Photography by Costa Christ Media

Our Monday Morning Millionaire is a grand, 1928 historic Highland Park Georgian mansion designed by Hal Thomson.

It’s getting harder and harder to find a historic home in Dallas that has avoided the bulldozer. People are so quick to tear down without thinking through why a house is still standing almost a century later.

It takes a sophisticated buyer to understand what provenance brings to the party and to realize you can no longer afford to build homes like 4209 Lorraine Avenue. This beautiful Georgian mansion is not only a masterpiece of original design, but it has also had a series of owners that have kept it up to date over the years.

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historical Colonial mansion

I’ve been waiting, patiently, for us to come out of the holidaze to show you this drop-dead gorgeous historical Colonial mansion at 4224 Armstrong Parkway. We see a lot of über luxury homes each day, but this one ticks every single box I can think of that a multi-million-dollar home should offer and some I’d never considered!

First and foremost, hats off to owner Torie Steele, the visionary behind the transformation of this historical Colonial mansion. So many buyers would have razed this baby, and we’d have written a sob story about how Dallas has no soul and doesn’t value historical properties. But here comes Steele to save the day and save it to a degree of perfection we seldom see. But then Steele is a perfectionist in many areas. If you know anything about fashion, Steele was an industry leader in the 1980s. She started her first eponymous boutique on Rodeo drive and was the first to bring multiple European designers together under one roof. This was way before department stores even considered carrying big name designers. If you keep up with the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show every year, you’ll have seen her wire fox terrier, Sky, win Best in Show a few years ago. She’s been breeding them with great success for over a decade. Striving for perfection and succeeding is in her DNA, and we’re delighted she turned her talents to saving this extraordinary home.

When you renovate a home to make it appealing and appropriate for the way we live in 2019, thoughtful and careful decisions must be made. This historical Colonial mansion has a provenance you don’t want to screw up. The original architect was Hal Thomson. For our newbies to Dallas, he was one of the most prolific architects of the era and designed many of the iconic homes on Swiss Avenue and in Highland Park.

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Stevens ParkOur Saturday Six Hundred is a gorgeous Venice-style Spanish mansion in the Stevens Park neighborhood of North Oak Cliff is just waiting for your Christmas tree and garlands.

And the beautiful 1846 Mayflower Dr. probably has some stories to tell, too, since it was built in 1928 by the architecture firm Flint & Broad, who were also responsible for many other buildings and homes in Dallas, including the Masonic Temple on Harwood Street, and parts of the aquarium at Fair Park and the original Love Field passenger terminal.

The firm also designed a Highland Park home on Versailles Avenue, and the Medical Arts Building in Shreveport, Louisiana, and the Black Hotel in Oklahoma City.

Thomas Broad and Lester Flint established their firm in 1923. Not much is known about Flint, other than he had served as president of the North Texas chapter of the American Institute of Architects during the Depression, and served as one of the first members of the State Board of Architectural Examiners.

More is known about Broad, who was born in Paris, Texas, and got his undergraduate degree in architecture from the University of Texas at Austin before attending Harvard for graduate school, leaving to go back home after a fire destroyed downtown Paris in 1916, where he helped with the rebuilding effort.

After stints in the U.S. Army Air Corp and then a firm in Kansas City, he went to Europe in 1921 to further his education. (more…)