Al_Coker_Windrose_Hero_Perspective_Final

Windrose Tower at Legacy West is currently open for pre-sales, but the sales center is slated to open just next month.

No one could be more excited about the new Windrose Tower at Legacy West than us here at CandysDirt.com.

Pre-sales have already launched for the luxurious 24-story high-rise, and the all-new sales center for the ground-breaking building — the only luxury condo development built north of LBJ since the Bonaventure — slated to open next month. The building will offer 85 to 95 condos ranging from 1,300 to 11,000 square feet with sleek, unparalleled finish-out.

The pre-sale campaign has been expertly spearheaded by Al Coker and Fernando Gonzalez of Al Coker & Associates. The marketing and brokerage firm is thrilled to show off vignettes of the property, so that prospective buyers can really picture themselves in the spaces. And the center is conveniently located, too, just across from the future site of Windrose Tower at Headquarters and the Tollway, 7800 N. Dallas Parkway, Suite 156.

The estimated completion date for the residences will be in the fourth quarter of 2018, but if you want to see the units before they’re built, make sure you’re the first person in the door of the sales center. Stay tuned right here to CandysDirt.com for more on Windrose Tower and the incredible, game-changing Legacy West development.

 

cliff kessler

Cliff Kessler is a Realtor with Allie Beth Allman & Assoc. and owner of Cowboy Surf Estates. Photo: Ana Bellington

Cliff Kessler is a Dallas transplant by way of Los Angeles, and the luxury real estate agent is making a name for himself as the owner of Cowboy Surf Estates.

Perhaps this is because has picked up on something essential about working real estate in Dallas: It’s all about relationships.

“It’s about the name, and I feel like the first thing people ask is, ‘Who is your family? Who’s your dad?’ I’ve made so many connections over a game of golf here, or taking someone to lunch,” he said. “Whereas in L.A., it’s all about marketing, websites, someone doing a blog.”

Kessler closed $3 million last year in his inaugural year in Dallas in 2015, and is looking at $22 million in pending real estate in 2016.

“This is a fantastic market, and I’m seeing a lot of sales through pocket listings, like in Lakewood, the M Streets, and parts of Highland Park,” he said. “Things are so hot here, you’re getting eight offers on a pocket if it’s priced right.”

 

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Photo: Karahan Cos.

JPMorgan Chase signed a letter of intent to build at Plano’s Legacy West development, moving 6,000 employees there over the next three years. Photo: Karahan Cos.

It’s been a rumored deal for months now, but now, Plano has another reason to celebrate. JPMorgan Chase has selected an anchor corner in Legacy West to build a $300-million, 1-million-square-foot high-rise campus to house 6,000 relocated employees from around DFW.

JPMorgan Chase signed a letter of intent Thursday to build at Legacy West, Plano’s 240-acre development. Construction is slated to start later this year, Chase spokesman Greg Hassell told Steve Brown at the Dallas Morning News.

The empty lot, located near the Dallas North Tollway and State Highway 121, is next to the new Liberty Mutual Insurance development, a $325-million office campus under construction now.

The letter of intent ends months of searching by Chase to find a location to consolidate some North Texas workers from Farmers Branch, downtown Dallas, Lewisville, Coppell, and other locations into a corporate office complex.

“We expect the first employees to start moving in to the new campus in the second half of 2017—total move-in will last through 2018 and 2019,” Hassell told Brown. “Over time, we expect 6,000 employees to work at the new campus — roughly half of our employee population in the Metroplex. We haven’t figured out where everybody comes from yet. We have people in a number of buildings across the Metroplex.”

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Harry!

I met Plano Mayor Harry LaRosiliere at a beautiful dinner party last Thursday evening, and I am besmitten. Not only do we share the same city route to life in Dallas —  via New York City —  he is one of the most dedicated young politicos I have ever met. The fact that he is The One guiding Plano through its super growth spurt fascinated me. Who is this interesting man running the show in what was once a sleepy farm bedroom community of Dallas, a suburb the Dallas elite very much disdained in the 1990s? Get a load of this quote from a story written about Plano housing in 1998:

Jeff Witt, the long-range planner for the city of Frisco who held the same job in Plano for 2/2 years, fears a manufactured slum. “1 was always concerned with the housing stock in Piano,” he says. “You have people who don*l want to invest in their houses. Ultimately, you have a very expensive deteriorating structure.” Witt says that the irony of the looming problem of shoddy Piano (sic, I think they mean Plano) housing is that it is a direct result of the city’s incredible growth and success. Perhaps the biggest reason the city has been able to attract some of the best companies in America is the affordable housing. Developers who erected hundreds of homes a year and kept unit costs down could sell for cheap and still maintain a solid profit margin, and employees transferred from Los Angeles or Phoenix or Boston were amazed to find 3.000 square feet for $250,000. The waves of migratory rich moved to North Texas, and, in a state where unions have always been weak, the work of laying bricks or installing carpentry-jobs traditionally performed by trained, unionized craftsmen-was done by workers with no specialized training. Although cheap labor almost always equals cheap workmanship, all the elements necessary for an unparalleled building boom were there: an abundance of low-wage immigrant workers, low interest rates, and great schools. The race was on.

Well then, cheap houses and all —

But the halcyon present is every day inching its way toward a precarious future. Jeff Witt, for one, is worried about that. “Plano is perceived as a very affluent town,” he says. “It’s a nice ZIP code to have. But that perception can change very quickly.”

Really? Now Plano is a near world-class city competing for, and snagging, some of the top businesses in the U.S.A. And where the hell is Jeff Witt?

And Plano has Harry! (more…)

Kylah Boyd Featured Realtor

We love meeting rookies in this business, and with how hot our market is, more and more talented professionals are choosing a career in real estate. It’s no wonder that we often find go-getters from brokerages all over Dallas, but it seems like the team at Vivo Realty in Uptown is full of young, hungry agents like Kylah Boyd.

When you’re in the first year of your real estate career, it helps to have a great lender by your side. What has your lender done for you lately? See what you’re missing by calling Jeff Lindigrin at Great Western Home Loans today.

Jump to learn more about Vivo Realty’s Kylah Boyd!

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Margaret Chambers downtown Dallas highrise study

The study of a downtown Dallas highrise, designed by Margaret Chambers. Photo: Dan Piassick

Interior designer Margaret Chambers is a pillar in the Dallas design community. She formed Chambers Interiors & Associates, Inc. 23 years ago after dreaming of having her own business, becoming known for her ability to confidently mix different styles, techniques, and cultures for her clients.

In those years, she’s come to regard Dallas as the ideal place for her thriving business, which employs five professionals, with every designer in the office having a degree in interior design.

Margaret Chambers

Margaret Chambers

“It is really a perfect place to practice interior design—people are very aware of interior designers and appreciate their ability to transform their home or office into a wonderful place to live and work,” Chambers said. “In Dallas, people can see a difference when a professional interior designer has created a space. In addition, Dallas is an international city and is continuing to grow, making it an exciting place for design to serve a wide range of people.”

Chambers’ work is award-winning, and has been published in more than 20 industry magazines, including Traditional Home, Texas Home & Living, and D Home. She is also a friend of CandysDirt, telling our readers about everything from kitchen design and investing in antiques to picking a chandelier and the best strategies to use to get your home on the market and sold.

You’ll find Chambers’ work in Highland Park, Preston Hollow, Plano, and other North Texas homes of discriminating clients, spanning a range of styles.

“I always try to make my work as classical and timeless as possible, whether I am doing a contemporary, transitional, or traditional home,” she said. “I want each project to have its own unique style that reflects the client’s unique taste. I also love to add in furniture, art, and accessories that are handmade. I feel these add warmth and a soul to the interior; they bring with them a history that enriches a space.”

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5935 Deseret Front

More proof that there are some really cool houses up north that are far from your standard, brick-and-stone-clad builder’s special. This 1970s contemporary in West Plano is a wonderful example of how you can find a fabulous, updated home with tons of great details up in Collin County.

Located inside Bent Trail, this lovely home not only has great curb appeal and perfect landscaping, but inside is a transitional transformation that is just perfect for a modern family.

Jump to see inside!

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employment growth

In Texas, it’s all about jobs, jobs, jobs.

A new report from the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University says that the Texas economy gained 276,400 nonagricultural jobs from June 2014 to June 2015, an annual growth rate of 2.4 percent, compared with 2.1 percent for the United States. Many of the major metropolitan areas in the state saw much bigger gains, like North Texas.

The Dallas-Plano-Irving metro area ranked No. 2 in job creation in the state (Midland was No. 1), followed by Odessa, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Austin-Round Rock, and San Antonio-New Braunfels. Fort Worth-Arlington ranked No. 7, with 2.7 percent job growth.

“The North Texas economy is more dependent on the U.S. economy, so it’s not energy-based, compared to the Houston or Midland-Odessa economy, where energy has a bigger weight,” said Real Estate Center research economist Luis Torres. “Because the U.S. economy is growing and doing better, you’re seeing that reflected in the Dallas economy.”

In fact, every single Texas metro areas except Wichita Falls had more jobs in June 2015 than a year ago.

Big sectors for job growth were:

  1. Leisure and Hospitality: 5.05 percent growth
  2. Education and health services: 3.87 percent growth
  3. Professional and business services: 3.54 percent growth
  4. Transportation, warehousing and utilities: 3.52 percent growth
  5. Construction: 3.34 percent growth

“The correlation between the Dallas economy and the U.S. economy is very high, and the main reason is because Dallas is a transportation hub and all the goods and services that pass in the state use Dallas transportation systems,” said Real Estate Center research economist Ali Anari.

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