University Manor Midcentury The moment you lay eyes on the house at 7140 Wild Valley Dr., you know you’re in for some serious Midcentury style.

This University Manor Midcentury Modern’s exterior is the first glimpse at its retro perfection, from geometric concrete walkway and horizontal wood fencing on both sides of the front, to a low-pitch gable roof and pink brick with chocolate brown accents.

Built in 1955, this house was one of the earliest in University Manor, a 3-2 on a heavily treed lot. The interior exudes atomic-era character, with 2,157 square feet of sleek, open, light-filled rooms.

This house’s value has been rising sharply over the past decade. It sold in 2006 for $209,900 and in 2012 for $290,500. There’s an active open contract on it today, listed for $375,000 by Lisa Johnson with Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate.

Let’s take a closer look at our Thursday Three Hundred and see what had it go under contract within days of hitting the market.

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Now is the time to start planning your backyard pool, says Harold Leidner. Find out why winter is a great time to get started.

Well, the holidays are over, it’s cold outside, and everyone is back to work and school. Now it’s back to the grind and the long haul till spring break. Maybe you’ve been thinking about putting in a pool, or maybe you’ve been remembering those warm summer days and how nice it would have been to have a pool in the backyard? You are not alone, but is now the time to start thinking about getting that pool project? We asked our friends over at Harold Leidner Landscape Architects to suggest a few reasons why you might want to get that project going.
Jump to see five reasons why you should start building your backyard oasis right now!

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If you’re free tonight, make your way to the Dallas Museum of Art to hear landscape architect and luminary Laurie Olin speak as part of the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Laurie Olin

Olin is internationally acclaimed, and one of only four recipients of the National Medal of Arts award from the National Endowment for the Arts. It is the highest honor given to artists by the U.S. government. The White House press release described Olin as a preeminent landscape architect, renowned for his acute sense of harmony and balance between nature and design.

In addition to founding the firm OLIN, he is the practice professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has taught for 30 years, and former chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University.

Olin is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects and the recipient of an Award in Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Design Medal from the American Society of Landscape Architects.

Event details

The lecture by Olin begins at 7 p.m., and there is a complimentary reception for lecture attendees beginning at 6:15 p.m. The event will be held in the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art, 1717 N. Harwood Street. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $5 for students (with ID), and can be purchased at the door. Dallas Architecture Forum members receive free admission to all regular forum lectures as a benefit of membership, and AIA members can earn one hour of CE credit for each lecture.

For more information on the Dallas Architecture Forum, visit www.dallasarchitectureforum.org or call 214-764-2406.

 

 

HLC Frost Cloth

With “Icemaggedon” hitting soon, and the cold weather officially upon us, it’s time to keep an eye out on protecting your plants from the freezing temperatures. We’ve asked noted landscape architect, Harold Leidner, to provide some insight and suggestions for protecting those plants from the cold temperatures.

Freeze Protection Methods

One of the essential freeze protection items that we install on all our projects is a rain and freeze sensor on the irrigation system. This sensor (which can be hard wired or wireless) activates once the temperature drops below 40 degrees and prevents the irrigation system from operating in cold temperatures and adding any water to the plants that may cause damage.

HLC Temperature detectorAnother primary method of protection those plans is to use a frost protection fabric or freeze cloth over the top of the plants. This fabric, which can usually be found at any nursery or home improvement store, will help wick water away from the plants, provide an additional layer of protection and help prevent any ice from forming on the plants.

We typically use short wood stakes to ‘tent’ the frost cloth above the plants and also use landscape pins to anchor the fabric down so windy conditions don’t blow it away. If the cold temps sneak up on you and you’re in a pinch, a good old bed sheet will work as well. (Just don’t use the nice ones!)

Plants That Need Protection

Most plant varieties sold at nurseries and used in the Dallas area will be cold hardy for the climate. However, there are certain varieties of plants, usually tropicals, that will need a little extra protection.

Palms are one of the primary plants that we take care to protect from cold temperatures. Sago palms (Cycas revoluta) certainly are fragile to the cold and will need to be covered. Windmill Palms (Trachycarpus fortunei) are generally cold hardy, but the trunks can be wrapped with a blanket or frost protection cloth. Other plants that are susceptible to freezing are Oleander (Nerium oleander), Variegated Ginger (Alpina vittata) and the vine Fig Ivy (Ficus pumila). All of which could benefit from the protection of a freeze cloth.

We find annuals to be optional but some of our clients prefer that we also cover their newly planted winter seasonal color like Pansies and Cyclamen. Any containers or potted plants that are not connected to irrigation or drainage, we would suggest simply moving them into the garage to weather the frigid night time temperatures.

Miss those 100 degree days yet?

Need help preparing for freezing weather? Contact the talented staff at Harold Leidner Landscape Architects to guide you.

Headington Condo Outside

Harold LeidnerIt’s hard to find a better landscape architect than Harold Leidner. I’d hazard to say that few, if any, can match his eye for how landscapes interact with their surroundings, and how to make modern design look and feel organic.

He’s best known for his amazing work on the 21st floor penthouse at the Ritz Carlton Residences that was recently purchased by Charles and Moll Anderson. Featuring bold shapes and textures, this project is a feast for the eyes.

Browse Leidner’s projects and designs on his Houzz page or find out more about his work on his website.

CandysDirt.com: Where are you from?

Harold Leidner: Born and raised in Dallas. Great place to live and work.

CD: How did you get into landscape architecture?

Leidner: Started in high school when I was mowing lawns and taking care of landscapes. It piqued my interest in the design of landscapes and the value of beautiful properties and gardens.

CD: Innovative outdoor design is a hallmark of your brand. What inspires you most?

Leidner: Sophisticated and modern design that is well detailed. I also enjoy seeing and incorporating unique items in the garden that are not typically found there. The recent Chihuly exhibit at the Arboretum was a great example. Having the artistry, color, and delicacy of the glass blended into the gardens was beautiful.

CD: Where is home for you in Dallas?

Leidner: I live in the Prestonwood neighborhood off Preston and Arapaho. We are fortunate to have a great lots that back up to a natural creek.

CD: And you drive ….let me guess, Mercedes Benz?

Leidner: BMW X5 M. Fun to drive and I love the gadgets.

CD: What is your favorite ‘hood in Dallas and why?

Leidner: Tough to call. Many great areas in Dallas like Preston Hollow, Kessler Park and Lakewood. I would probably say Uptown, mostly because I’m a Mavs fan.

CD: What project are you most proud of?

Leidner: Now that is even more difficult. I have had the pleasure of working for many wonderful clients and on many gorgeous projects. One of my recent favorites was a residence we completed in Highland Park for Betty Lou Phillips. Combination of a beautiful site, superb architecture along with a client with an exquisite design sense.

CD: Likewise, what was your most challenging or memorable project?

Leidner: My most memorable project was probably the penthouse terraces we completed a couple years ago at the Ritz Carlton Residences in Dallas. A once in a lifetime project overlooking the skyline of downtown Dallas. Spectacular views, especially at night. The construction was an immense challenge however, in getting all the workers, tools and materials from the ground to the 21st floor. Not as easy as you might think.

Headington Condo outside 2

CD: Has your work taught you any life lessons?

Leidner: Everything changes except the completion date.

CD: What does the future of design look like?

Leidner: Our designs and clients are all pushing towards a clean and modern design style that fits their lifestyle. Fortunately we are seeing more residential architecture lean a bit more towards modern, which allows us to respond with luxurious landscapes and gardens that simplify the outdoor living experience and enjoyment of nature.

CD: If you ever change careers for an encore you’ll…

Leidner: Become a doctor like my daughter.

CD: Do you have a second home?

Leidner: Besides my office and car, no.