Santavenere Hotel high chairOK, I have to show you this. FORBES slide show of the best places to get married, huge stupendous mansions such as the Oheka Castle & Estate, in Huntington, New York, where Chelsea Clinton got married. The mansions are truly glorious, though I feel the M Mansion, up off Frankfort Road here in Dallas where my son got married, holds its own on a smaller scale and even reminds me a bit of the Pantheon Mansion in Corona, California.

But check out the Santavenere Hotel, Maratea, Italy. To advertise the wedding venue, they show a couple with a baby’s high chair. Isn’t that like putting the cart before the horse? Or am I just living in the 20th century???

Chicago's not so hot anymore. The huge mid-west MSA didn't even make the top 20 list of Forbes' fastest growing American cities! (Photo: John Gress/Reuters)

Chicago’s not so hot anymore. The huge mid-west MSA didn’t even make the top 20 list of Forbes’ fastest growing American cities! (Photo: John Gress/Reuters)

As Candy already mentioned, pre-owned inventory is scary low, which is driving prices up for Dallas properties. Sure, demand means a seller’s market, but what about all of the folks that are either being born or moving to Dallas? That’s putting our housing market in a tough spot! Several big corporations have moved to Dallas in recent years — Comerica Bank being one of the largest — which has made move-in ready pre-owned homes sell like hotcakes.

For the study, Forbes measured the top 100 Metropolitan Statistical Areas using six metrics:

Using data from Moody’s Analytics, we assessed the estimated rate of population growth for 2012 and 2013, the rate of job growth in 2012, and the rate of gross metro product growth, or economic growth, for 2012. We also factored in federal unemployment data and median salaries for local college-educated workers, courtesy of Payscale.com. The result is a list of the 20 fastest growing metro areas in America in terms of population and economy.

I find it interesting that the three largest Texas cities — Austin, Dallas, and Houston — topped the national list based on these criteria, with San Antonio coming in ninth. Texas cities grew by 470,000 people in 2012!

Houston ranked second, behind Austin, followed by Dallas in third place and San Antonio in ninth. Robust labor markets, unemployment rates under 6% (well below the national average), no state income tax, a business-friendly regulatory environment, and strong population inflows all contributed to Texas towns’ high rankings.

Sure, we ranked high in 2012, but this is a year in which the Texas Legislature convenes, and we’re facing funding shortages across the board. Let’s see if we’re still considered “business-friendly” after the session in Austin.

Still, I wonder if this growth is sustainable for the Dallas housing market. Will we see an uptick in rentals? What will happen if the residential lending environment sours?

New York City, of course, is first with 53 billionaires who collectively are worth $1.53 trillion. But Forbes Magazine says Dallas came in right behind the Big Apple with 17 of the wealthiest, beating out San Francisco at 16. Of course, a lot of billionaires are scattered along the Peninsula south of San Fran. But then, I saw that Fort Worth had 8 billionaires, which collectively makes 25 of the world’s richest billionaires residents of North Texas.

I’m looking for their homes, all of them, starting with Andy Beal, worth $7 billion, Beal Bank. If you know where he lives, please email Candace@Candysdirt.com.

I’ve written about most of the others, so this ought to be fun.