Junius HeightsThe Junius Heights Historic District in Old East Dallas is home to the largest collection of Arts and Crafts/Craftsman-style houses in the southwestern United States. As Dallas’ largest historic neighborhood, Junius Heights is a treasure trove of handsome architectural designs, like the rare “airplane bungalow” at 722 N. Beacon St., our Thursday Three Hundred today.

“Airplane bungalows” became popular in the 1920s, an Arts and Crafts style named because the “pop-up” second story was thought to resemble a cockpit over its wings.

This house was built in 1913, so it’s an early example, and a rarity in Dallas—these types of “airplane bungalows” are mainly found on the West coasts of the U.S. and Canada. The exterior is a faithful representation of the style, with its low-pitched, gabled roof; oversized eaves with exposed rafters; wide, welcoming front porch; and open soffits. The color palette is perfectly Arts and Crafts, in sage, cream, and a deep red accent color.

The interior has been renovated in the last year to expand the master suite and update the kitchen and second bathroom. But you’ll still find historic features throughout its 2,020 square feet, like decorative leaded windows, hardwood floors, and an original fireplace.

This three bedroom, 2.5 bath beauty is listed by Peggye Johnson at Group One Realtors for $339,000.

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OCTA Group Shot

Dallas City Manager AC Gonzales stands with Luis Salcedo, Sylvia Salcedo, Councilman Scott Griggs, Jason Roberts, former OC Chamber President Bob Stimson along with board members and friends of the Oak Cliff Transit Authority.

The story of a neighborhood’s resurgence is always unique, but chances are it begins with the work of a handful of dedicated residents. North Oak Cliff‘s recent redevelopment has been just short of dramatic — and this month’s opening of the OC Streetcar may be the most impactful development yet.

It might appear to outsiders as though the trolly came as a blessing bestowed by City Hall or by the award of a federal grant, but in reality it was accomplished as most change happens — by a handful of dedicated residents.

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The Davis Building, aka Republic National Bank Building, in downtown has Dallas Historic Landmark Designation. 1926 this structure was the tallest in Dallas. In 1945, this structure was the largest office site in Dallas. Photo: Davis Building.

Downtown Dallas’ Davis Building, aka Republic National Bank Building, has Dallas Historic Landmark Designation. In 1926 this structure was the tallest in Dallas. In 1945, it was the largest office site in Dallas. Photo: Davis Building.

Dallas has a rich historic and architectural legacy, shown through buildings like the Texas Theatre in Oak Cliff, DeGolyer House and Gardens in East Dallas, and the Eastside Warehouse District and State Thomas neighborhood in Uptown.

But just because a building or neighborhood plays an important part in the story of Dallas doesn’t mean it’s protected from big changes, up to and including demolishment.

Just last September, 1611 Main Street and neighboring buildings were razed as part of the Joule’s expansion plans. It was a beautiful Romanesque Revival built in 1885, one of downtown’s oldest structures. It sat next to the site of another Dallas landmark torn down by the Joule in 2012, the former Praetorian Building.

Lakewood Theater is another example of an unprotected structure—it may be beloved, but nothing stands between it and the wrecking ball besides the assurances of the owner that they won’t demolish as part of renovation plans.

That’s where historic designation comes into play and the efforts of Dallas preservationists to care for the future of the buildings and neighborhoods that have shaped what our city into what it is today.

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An old brochure for Kessler Park shows the beautiful stone stairways that can be found within the neighborhood.

An old brochure for Kessler Park shows the beautiful stone stairways that can be found within the neighborhood.

Rachel Stone at the Oak Cliff Advocate has an update on an unexpectedly contentious issue that has formed battle lines among Kessler Park residents: The steps between Canterbury Court and Edgefield Avenue.

The stone walkway, which was installed by the original developers of Kessler Park, North Texas Trust Co., was part of a system of small pocket parks that were meant to attract wealthy families to the neighborhood. However, the steps have fallen into disrepair, and until recently, it wasn’t exactly clear who owned the steps or was responsible for their maintenance.

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