Bud Oglesby Townhome in the Heart of Oak Lawn | CandysDirt.com

Bud Oglesby’s architectural work is a Dallas treasure, and we have lots of it. Today’s Tuesday Two Hundred is a Oglesby-designed townhome in the heart of the Oak Lawn neighborhood.

Located at 2727 Hood St. Apt. 107, this townhome is a midcentury modern masterpiece, built in 1964 and extensively updated in a way that adds to the character of the era’s architecture and adds the kind of modern amenities buyers love. And it’s well under $300K, so don’t expect this one to stay on the market long.

The design is contemporary, with an open living and dining room, a dreamy kitchen, and gorgeous bathrooms. This unit has two bedrooms, one full bathroom, one half bath, and 972 square feet on two stories. Let’s take a look!

(more…)

Bud Oglesby Designed Condo | CandysDirt.com

Architect-designed living isn’t just for the wealthy. We’ve found a midcentury condo for under $200K, designed by Bud Oglesby, one of the most important Dallas modernist architects of the 20th century.

Oglesby and his firm, Oglesby Greene Architects, were creators of the Mahanna Condos at 3116 Mahanna St. in Oak Lawn. Apartment 5 just went on the market and it’s a beautiful example of his work.

Located near Cedar Springs Road and the Dallas North Tollway, these condos were built in 1958 and offer a lovely midcentury aesthetic on the exterior. This is an intimate, private, gated complex with landscaped common areas and a swimming pool.

This condo has two bedrooms, one full bathroom, one half bathroom, and 1,073 square feet on one story. Let’s take a look!

(more…)

10300 Strait Lane ext

Comes word that the tear down of the Bud Oglesby home at 10300 Strait came sooner rather than later.

In fact, she is gone, her body laid to a fitful rest somewhere in Lewisville …

Bud O 1

(more…)

Cliff Welch

Cliff Welch’s E. Lake Highlands Drive home featured in next weekend’s tenth annual White Rock Home Tour. Photos of house: Eric Homes

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the first one here and the second one here).

Cliff Welch

Photo: Cliff Welch

Cliff Welch, AIA, is a Dallas-based architect who champions modern architecture and designs with inspiration drawn from modern architecture of the last century.

His background includes working with the late Dallas modernist Bud Oglesby, later becoming a principal at Design International before starting his own firm, Welch Architecture, in January 2000.

One of his designs, located on East Lake Highlands Drive, is featured on the 10th annual White Rock Home Tour April 25-26. When the tour started in 2005, it showcased midcentury modern homes in the White Rock area; it has now expanded to include new construction, as well.

Welch earned his Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Master of Architecture from the University of Texas at Arlington. His work has received multiple Merit and Citation Awards from the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), as well as their coveted Young Architect of the Year award. He has also earned honors from Preservation Dallas, the Texas Society of Architects, D Home magazine, and the AIA.

Welch is the past president of the Dallas Architectural Foundation and taught graduate-level architecture classes at UT Arlington. He is a past executive board member of the Dallas Chapter AIA, also serving two years as their Commissioner of Design, and has chaired multiple chapter events, including various home tours. He also served as a design awards juror for other chapters around the state.

Welch’s White Rock Home Tour house’s elegant simplicity and open spaces incorporate modern design to create an exception environment.

(more…)

Inwood HOTW 10300 Strait Lane

I was searching high and low for a home that typifies the state of Dallas real estate in 2014, where it is, where it is going. Dallas is growing like gangbusters — our real estate market is one of the strongest in the nation. Only Austin’s, Houston’s may be stronger. Luxury homebuyers are moving closer in to urban homesteads, but still loving the land and acreages only Dallas can provide within city limits. And it is clear, very clear, that the modernist touch is here to stay.

So when I saw that Susan Marcus had listed Nancy Dedman’s modern masterpiece –well, one of them — at 10300 Strait Lane, designed by Dallas modernist architect Bud Oglesby, I said, this is it.

Listed shortly before the holidays in October, this inclusive and exclusive estate is on 3.5 verdant acres with beautifully proportioned rooms taking in the full views of the grounds, including a private pond. It’s on the creekside. And it was designed by one of the city’s pre-eminent architects.

“Bud was a genius at siting,” says Susan, who was a personal friend. She is absolutely correct.

Enslie “Bud” Oglesby was also master of light, which we need in these parts. Born in Phoenix, he was raised in San Angelo, graduated Cornell and received his masters in architecture from M.I.T. His firm, Oglesby Group Architects, was one of the most significant architectural firms in Dallas for years, and he influenced a tremendous number of current architects, including modernist Ron Wommack. Oglesby also studied and lived in Sweden.

Oglesby recognized that people in Dallas “travel a lot, and there are so many choices of materials that it prevents a definitive look.” His homes sport a relaxed contemporary elegance, always exploring light but also accommodating the practicalities that a home must be functional to accomodate a family’s lifestyle.

In a sense, he was ahead of his time. We do travel a lot, in and out and to our second and third homes. And is there a definitive look to a Dallas home?

If anything is definitive, I suggest that Oglesby’s homes may be the ultimate Dallas home.

Consider his other works — Oglesby designed Nancy Lemmon’s highly distilled one-bedroom Highland Park home with incredible lightness, soaring ceilings, and precisely placed windows — but no skylights! This was her downsizing cottage, built after living in a 10,000 14,000 square foot home Oglesby also designed for Nancy (and her ex-Mark) at 5411 Surrey Circle. That home was sold to the Kusin family, someone else is enjoying it now. Ironically, Susan Marcus also sold Surrey Circle to the Kusins, then helped Nancy purchase the site of her downsized home on Arcady. Nancy had asked Oglesby to design her a home half the size of her beloved Surry Circle, to replicate it if possible, but smaller. The architect gave her exactly what she wanted.

10300 Strait Ln drive up 10300 Strait Lane patio 10300 Strait Lane pool 10300 Strait Lane tennis10300 Strait Lane is not a huge home, at 6872 square feet. Indeed, home sizes are creeping up again as they always do when the economy gets better. I swear, home sizes have replaced hemlines as the new economic bellwether.   During the recession, Americans downsized and the average new home shrunk by 6% to 2,135 square feet.  And I recall writing the doomsday prophecy of the McMansion. Really? During the past three years, the average size of new U.S. homes has grown significantly, according to a recent Census Bureau report. In 2012, the median home in the U.S. hit an all-time record of 2,306 square feet, up 8% from 2009.

Like I said, it’s house size now, not skirts.

10300 Strait Lane has wide galleries for art display connecting three main wings, all surrounding a central courtyard. The sitting room off the master has a fireplace and views the pond. There are four additional bedrooms each with en suite baths. The kitchen is in the rear with butlers pantry, laundry room, den, another fireplace and wet bar. The estate also has a pool, tennis court, 3 car garage, 2 room quarters. The home has had only two owners, Margaret Jonnson Rogers, Erik Jonnson’s daughter, who commissioned Oglesby. The home was built in 1971. Asking price is $7,490,000. The lot is probably the most desirable on Strait, sitting in the middle of the street, selected back when the area was virgin, home-less land.

Oglesby’s designs demonstrate his concern with the treatment of the intense light in Texas. He once said, “How you deal with light is extremely important. How you let it enter a building, how you treat it on outside surfaces–through trellises, shutters, courtyards and recessed windows–is crucial.”

Very important issue in 2014.

Thus 10300 Strait is not merely the home not of the week, but of the year going forward in 2014. It was designed and built by one of the city’s most influential, historical architects, owned by one of the city’s most philanthropic families, sited on acreage that was once considered the country but now very much within the city. It manages to be a mansion elegantly, tastefully, without gobbling up the land with unnecessary square footage. It goes easy on the land, respects it. We will be doing more of this in 2014.

And the home has history. Nancy Dedman entertained lavishly here, and you can feel the fun in it’s bones. Staging is being completed by Blu Sky Living, stay very tuned for more interior photos…10300 Strait pond

Note: This post has been updated with the address of the home on Surrey Circle. 

Inwood HOTW 10300 Strait Lane

I was searching high and low for a home that typifies the state of Dallas real estate in 2014, where it is, where it is going. Dallas is growing like gangbusters — our real estate market is one of the strongest in the nation. Only Austin’s, Houston’s may be stronger. Luxury homebuyers are moving closer in to urban homesteads, but still loving the land and acreages only Dallas can provide within city limits. And it is clear, very clear, that the modernist touch is here to stay.

So when I saw that Susan Marcus had listed Nancy Dedman’s modern masterpiece –well, one of them — at 10300 Strait Lane, designed by Dallas modernist architect Bud Oglesby, I said, this is it.

Listed shortly before the holidays in October, this inclusive and exclusive estate is on 3.5 verdant acres with beautifully proportioned rooms taking in the full views of the grounds, including a private pond. It’s on the creekside. And it was designed by one of the city’s pre-eminent architects.

“Bud was a genius at siting,” says Susan, who was a personal friend. She is absolutely correct.

Enslie “Bud” Oglesby was also master of light, which we need in these parts. Born in Phoenix, he was raised in San Angelo, graduated Cornell and received his masters in architecture from M.I.T. His firm, Oglesby Group Architects, was one of the most significant architectural firms in Dallas for years, and he influenced a tremendous number of current architects, including modernist Ron Wommack. Oglesby also studied and lived in Sweden.

Oglesby recognized that people in Dallas “travel a lot, and there are so many choices of materials that it prevents a definitive look.” His homes sport a relaxed contemporary elegance, always exploring light but also accommodating the practicalities that a home must be functional to accomodate a family’s lifestyle.

In a sense, he was ahead of his time. We do travel a lot, in and out and to our second and third homes. And is there a definitive look to a Dallas home?

If anything is definitive, I suggest that Oglesby’s homes may be the ultimate Dallas home.

Consider his other works — Oglesby designed Nancy Lemmon’s highly distilled one-bedroom Highland Park home with incredible lightness, soaring ceilings, and precisely placed windows — but no skylights! This was her downsizing cottage, built after living in a 10,000 14,000 square foot home Oglesby also designed for Nancy (and her ex-Mark) at 5411 Surrey Circle. That home was sold to the Kusin family, someone else is enjoying it now. Ironically, Susan Marcus also sold Surrey Circle to the Kusins, then helped Nancy purchase the site of her downsized home on Arcady. Nancy had asked Oglesby to design her a home half the size of her beloved Surry Circle, to replicate it if possible, but smaller. The architect gave her exactly what she wanted.

10300 Strait Ln drive up 10300 Strait Lane patio 10300 Strait Lane pool 10300 Strait Lane tennis10300 Strait Lane is not a huge home, at 6872 square feet. Indeed, home sizes are creeping up again as they always do when the economy gets better. I swear, home sizes have replaced hemlines as the new economic bellwether.   During the recession, Americans downsized and the average new home shrunk by 6% to 2,135 square feet.  And I recall writing the doomsday prophecy of the McMansion. Really? During the past three years, the average size of new U.S. homes has grown significantly, according to a recent Census Bureau report. In 2012, the median home in the U.S. hit an all-time record of 2,306 square feet, up 8% from 2009.

Like I said, it’s house size now, not skirts.

10300 Strait Lane has wide galleries for art display connecting three main wings, all surrounding a central courtyard. The sitting room off the master has a fireplace and views the pond. There are four additional bedrooms each with en suite baths. The kitchen is in the rear with butlers pantry, laundry room, den, another fireplace and wet bar. The estate also has a pool, tennis court, 3 car garage, 2 room quarters. The home has had only two owners, Margaret Jonnson Rogers, Erik Jonnson’s daughter, who commissioned Oglesby. The home was built in 1971. Asking price is $7,490,000. The lot is probably the most desirable on Strait, sitting in the middle of the street, selected back when the area was virgin, home-less land.

Oglesby’s designs demonstrate his concern with the treatment of the intense light in Texas. He once said, “How you deal with light is extremely important. How you let it enter a building, how you treat it on outside surfaces–through trellises, shutters, courtyards and recessed windows–is crucial.”

Very important issue in 2014.

Thus 10300 Strait is not merely the home not of the week, but of the year going forward in 2014. It was designed and built by one of the city’s most influential, historical architects, owned by one of the city’s most philanthropic families, sited on acreage that was once considered the country but now very much within the city. It manages to be a mansion elegantly, tastefully, without gobbling up the land with unnecessary square footage. It goes easy on the land, respects it. We will be doing more of this in 2014.

And the home has history. Nancy Dedman entertained lavishly here, and you can feel the fun in it’s bones. Staging is being completed by Blu Sky Living, stay very tuned for more interior photos…10300 Strait pond

Note: This post has been updated with the address of the home on Surrey Circle. 

Brian's TeethBrian Davis is one of my fave people. The man knows real estate and when he put his last home on the market, I almost moved to Oak Cliff. Remember this puppy? It was just so DAMN cute! Seriously, I could have eaten that home.

Well, Brian is at it again. He just found a home in Wynnewood, 2200 square feet built in 1959 on 1/2 an acre on — are you ready? — a two and one-half acre lake. A treasure nestled just south of downtown Dallas, Wynnewood North is among the best values in Dallas, sporting well-designed, high-quality mid century modern homes by noted designers such as Bud Oglesby and Oschner Hare & Hare. One of Oglesby’s earliest contemporary homes is on Bizerte Drive.

Wynnewood was developed by Dallas oilman Angus Wynne Jr., who acquired the land from his uncle Toddie Lee Wynne Sr. and American Home Realty Company during the post-World War II building boom. Most homes were built in the 1950’s. Wynnewood became the first “packaged” suburb in Dallas, and Brian says the streets are all named after World War II items: Angus really wanted to sell to the vets. At the time, popular homes were remote from the inner city, and people here walked or bicycled from home to shopping, though one early settler tells me many people would drive from store store at Wynnewood Center. Such is America’s love affair with the automobile! This home was a one-owner home, that owner being a Connie Davis.
11895474_22_1

11895474_3_1 11895474_2_1 11895474_1_1 11895474_5_1 11895474_7_1 11895474_9_1Brian says there are about 15 homes on the lake and he truly thinks he has found nirvana.

Oh but well, he found something else, too. While beginning the clean up/renovation process on his home — those of us who have done this sort of thing know the fun of Friday and Saturday nights spent scrubbing corners with a toothbrush, scraping or painting– what did he find?

Connie’s gold teeth in a jar in the bathroom cabinet.

What interesting things have previous homeowners left behind in your home or listing?

This is one of those moments when you just want to go, ahhhh. Breathe deeply, because you will need it to get up the hill, the HILLS. This stunning abode in the bluffs is the home of a Dallas couple named David and Emily Corrigan. They LOVE  architecturally significant homes. In fact, they told D Home Magazine a few years ago that, while David grew up in a traditional Highland Park home, Emily grew up steeped in Bud Oglesby on Strait Lane with interiors by the late, great John Astin Perkins. In late 2005, the Corrigans, who lived in a fairly traditional ranch in Preston Hollow, felt edged out by the McMansions shooting up around them, hemming them in. So they went shopping, and found a contemporary home on this magical hill in bucolic Bluffview, built by Dallas architect Downing Thomas in the 1950s. It was almost more about the setting than the house: lush, hilly, and heavily treed, country-esque, the anti-thesis of flat Dallas. It reminded David and their boys more of life on the family ranch or fishing camp.

It was, of course, Bluffview. 

The home was completely remodeled, calling in nationally-renown interior designer Emily Summers — mother of Caroline  Summers — and Mary Elizabeth Johnson to do the heavy lifting. Two-thirds of the original home was torn down, and during the two-year renovation miracles took place. Like moving the swimming pool to create more yard space. When it was finally complete in 2007, they had a whopping 9090 square feet, four bedrooms, six and a half baths, loaded with details only your heart could desire from cedar closets in the bedrooms to a second master suite, library, gameroom, mud room, complete exterior misting and mosquito repellent system,  and extraordinarily huge windows that  bring the outdoors in and make it seem as though the trees and critters are an active part of the interiors. The master is not just a treasure, it has won several design awards. There is also outdoor living with two grills and a fireplace overlooking the waterfall pool. You could live out here, but much better in the guest house with two bedrooms, two full baths, kitchen, living area and office.

Emily Corrigan told D Home she wanted to seriously collect Greek and Byzantine pottery when her family is grown. We can only say, please invite us over to see your NEXT home! In the meantime, this baby, fresh on the market, will set you back $7,200,000. What do you know: 7 is my lucky number!