david stocker

The Sunnybrook Residence by architects David Stocker and Stephen Lohr of Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro. Photo: Nathan Schroder

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here). This column was originally posted on April 20. 

In Dallas, architect David Stocker, AIA, is well-known for his residential, commercial, and sacred spaces. He approaches his work theologically, he says, creating beauty in a broken world, one project at a time.

David Stocker

David Stocker, AIA

“I see beauty as largely objective—in a sense we are ‘hardwired’ to experience beauty,” Stocker said. “It is a common trait in our humanity. The creative process is really discovering, or in most cases re-discovering, these timeless patterns of what is known as beauty.”

He is a principal at Uptown-based Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects, a firm he co-founded with Mark Hoesterey and Enrique Montenegro almost 11 years ago. As the firm profile states, “We consider ourselves ordinary people who are extraordinarily good at our work. We care deeply about our craft and who it affects, and it is our desire to be always conscious of our design principles and core values, regardless of project type, scope, style, or location.”

Their portfolio on Houzz is a testament to the beauty they create. In fact, they’ve received the “Best of Houzz” design and service awards 2014-2015, and a design award this year. We sat down with Stocker and asked him about his background, philosophy, favorite projects, and more.

CandysDirt: You grew up in Central Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago. How did that influence you?

David Stocker: It gave me great access, at an early age, to the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Mies van der Rohe, and others and began my love of architecture. I began my move towards Texas by going to architecture school at the University of Arkansas. I was fortunate that E. Fay Jones was active at the school and professor at the time. I loved the school and the program (my daughter is attending now). I graduated in 1984 and decided to make Texas my home and begin my career at HKS [Architects].

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david stocker

The Sunnybrook Residence by architects David Stocker and Stephen Lohr of Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro. Photo: Nathan Schroder

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

In Dallas, architect David Stocker, AIA, is well-known for his residential, commercial, and sacred spaces. He approaches his work theologically, he says, creating beauty in a broken world, one project at a time.

David Stocker

David Stocker, AIA

“I see beauty as largely objective—in a sense we are ‘hardwired’ to experience beauty,” Stocker said. “It is a common trait in our humanity. The creative process is really discovering, or in most cases re-discovering, these timeless patterns of what is known as beauty.”

He is a principal at Uptown-based Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects, a firm he co-founded with Mark Hoesterey and Enrique Montenegro almost 11 years ago. As the firm profile states, “We consider ourselves ordinary people who are extraordinarily good at our work. We care deeply about our craft and who it affects, and it is our desire to be always conscious of our design principles and core values, regardless of project type, scope, style, or location.”

Their portfolio on Houzz is a testament to the beauty they create. In fact, they’ve received the “Best of Houzz” design and service awards 2014-2015, and a design award this year. We sat down with Stocker and asked him about his background, philosophy, favorite projects, and more.

CandysDirt: You grew up in Central Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago. How did that influence you?

David Stocker: It gave me great access, at an early age, to the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Mies van der Rohe, and others and began my love of architecture. I began my move towards Texas by going to architecture school at the University of Arkansas. I was fortunate that E. Fay Jones was active at the school and professor at the time. I loved the school and the program (my daughter is attending now). I graduated in 1984 and decided to make Texas my home and begin my career at HKS [Architects].

(more…)

The Trammell Crow home in Highland Park was in that family for more than 50 years. Now it's time for new owners to enjoy the 10,000-square-foot house. Photo: courtesy of Dallas Morning News.

The Trammell Crow home in Highland Park was in that family for more than 50 years. Now it’s time for new owners to enjoy the 10,000-square-foot house. Photo: courtesy of Dallas Morning News & Allie Beth Allman

A slice of local history has hit the market, with the Highland Park estate of the late Dallas real estate developer and art collector Trammell Crow and his late wife Margaret now listed with Allie Beth Allman & Associates.

Located between Preston Road and Turtle Creek Boulevard, the 10,000-square-foot Tudor-style house has a price tag that reflects storied history, palatial size, and tony location: at $59.4 million, this is one of the highest priced properties ever listed in the area. As of now, this is an off-market listing not yet in the MLS.

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I am choosing 6124 St. Andrews as my Candy Sale of the Week because it is a true tree house in Dallas. I am heading west today, to sample the beautiful living in the trees of Northern California at Calistoga Ranch. This hidden architectural treasure designed by Gary Cunningham, AIA, gave me packing inspiration.

And it is also the most amazing one-bedroom home in North Texas. Really, this is the most perfect empty-nester retirement home ever. You are not rocking on the porch. You are communing with the trees and nature surrounded by exquisite design!

Cunningham chose Pennsylvania blue stone for the exterior, both irregular slab pieces and  a cut stacked design that evokes a  controlled ramshackle, blend-in-with-nature feel. Then there is the standing seam copper roof that has the aged patina to blend in beautifully with the setting. The home is glass view of gardens upon glass view of gardens. Every angle from all of the living areas of the home takes advantage of the walls of glass, truly connecting the home with its magnificent setting. Your feet will tap on the stained concrete concrete floors and you may think you are in the mountains. The first floor holds the living room, library, gorgeous over-the-top kitchen with maple cabinetry and a window wall with glass shelving that floods the kitchen with natural light. Nearby is the informal dining room, a trophy room/family room and laundry room.

The 26 by 14 foot master bedroom suite is upstairs, but no worries: this home has an elevator for the weak-kneed. The master also views the gardens through more glass, and there are dual baths and probably the most famous master closet in town. There is a sitting room with a hidden bar, open to the two-story living room below. Then there is the bridge —  a dramatic suspended walkway that connects the sitting room to a private glass walled office. (The office could easily be converted to a second bedroom and full bath.) The finishes of every square inch are obsessively perfect, from the smooth as a baby’s butt glass finish walls to the smallest hardware details. Yes, it is a 7631 square foot, one-bedroom house with two and a half baths. It was built as a downsizing home and is a Baby Boomer’s dream house: a 3-car garage for the sports cars one can finally have now that Suburbans can be put to pasture, or to the ranch, multiple storage rooms for scrapbooks, sprinkler, security and mosquito systems so you can enjoy the woods and dinner without becoming dinner. Listed with David Nichols, Mathews Nichols Group, for $5,750,000. The home has been on the market since April and the price has not so much as thought about heading south. Don’t blame them. This home is one of the treasure homes of Dallas.