Frisco and Little Elm are strong areas for relocation, with new homes and recent builds like 5157 Sylvan Shores.

Frisco and Little Elm are strong areas for relocation, with new homes and recent builds like 5157 Sylvan Shores.

We already know the “why” behind people moving to Texas: Jobs. But what about the “where” and “how many”? In the just released Texas relocation report from the Texas Association of Realtors, Texas was ranked as the second most popular relocation destination.

“The diverse job opportunities and high quality of life in Texas continues to drive in-state and out-of-state migration to Texas cities and counties, both big and small,” said Vicki Fullerton, 2017 chairman of the Texas Association of Realtors. “This is the third consecutive year that Texas has gained more than 500,000 new residents from out of state.”

Analyzing statewide and national migration data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the report showed that Texas continues to be a high-demand destination for U.S. residents relocating across the country.

(more…)

Libby Hamer, John Maluso, Maureen Steitle

As you may have heard, Jamba Juice is moving its headquarters to North Texas. Specifically, Frisco. I want to note that the company, headquartered in Emeryville, California, will be getting $800,000 in grants from the City of Frisco and the Texas Enterprise Fund. Yes, that means that the company is getting a “bribe” to relocate it’s headquarters but that economic investment will more than pay off. More than 100 people will be relocating to Dallas to work in the company’s new Frisco office at 3001 Dallas Parkway.

The new digs include 19,000 square feet of office and meeting space and a 6,000-square-foot test kitchen and storefront.

Jamba Juice has chosen Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Real Estate’s new Plano office as their relocation team. In fact, John Maluso, sales director of the office, tells me Briggs has moved its entire relocation division to the new Plano location.

John was on his way to California when I spoke with him this morning. He said employees found out last Thursday that the move was taking place, shortly before the press release was released. John is flying out to meet with all of the JJ employees who have been offered relocation.

“The company thinks that even some of the employees who have NOT yet been offered packages will also relocate, ” said John.

Jamba Juice (more…)

Clean it up and store it

When you’re selling your house, what do you do with all the “stuff”? Karen Eubank has solutions.

Getting ready to sell your house can be overwhelming. The first word your Realtor is going to mention is “declutter.” Then the stager will come in and remark that items need to be stored because it’s hard to see the gorgeous architectural details with your beautiful furniture blocking the columns and impeding the view.

What all of this really means is that selling your home will be a challenge unless you get rid of some stuff. But where do you turn? The general consensus is Craigslist can be hit or miss, eBay takes patience and time, and garage sales require energy and organization. You’ll probably be short on at least two of these if you’re about to list your home.

But it doesn’t have to be a headache. We’ve rounded up some of our favorite resources to help you get your house whipped into shape so you can move on down the road to your next adventure. (more…)

WalletHub Retirement Map

WalletHub released its 2015 list of the best and worst places to retire based on 23 metrics across the 150 largest cities in the USA. Texas is a mixed bag. Unsurprisingly, six of the top 10 are in Florida (4) and Arizona (2) – states with no income taxes and long-time targets of the retirement set (and so resources targeting seniors). The first Texas city in the rankings is Amarillo at #14 – we’ll talk about that later.

The main buckets of “affordability,” “activities,” “quality of life,” and “health care” are each sub-divided into smaller buckets. Some of these sub-buckets are subjective. For example, within “activities” there are the numbers per 100,000 residents of senior centers, fishing, hiking, golf, adult volunteer activities and another WalletHub comparison on “recreation” that includes parks and overall climate.

I don’t know about you, but fishing, hiking and golf are not high on my list now or in retirement. And besides, many cities in Texas are penalized by geography. For example, coastal cities in Florida and Hawaii are the winners in fishing while cities with hilly or mountainous geographies nab the top spots for hiking. In flat cities like Dallas, hiking is called walking.

When looking for a place to retire, first examine your own needs and desires – and in many cases the subjectivity of intangible measurements. For example, there’s the assumption that retirees want to live surrounded by other retirees. Like gravity, the more old folks there are, the more it will attract. While there is something to be said for living around people with shared life experiences and longevity, personally I’d want to live in a more vibrant area to expose myself to the world of new ideas and change rather than a seniors-centric bubble of early dinners, coupons and golf carts.

Some numbers are head-scratching. For example, Dallas is ranked #72 out of 100 for climate while Arlington nets #36 and Fort Worth #32. Winter-filled Boise, ID is ranked #26 while “driving with potholders for half the year” Scottsdale, AZ is #3, Phoenix is #17 and neighboring Chandler, AZ, is #14. How do weather and climate differ so dramatically in the space of 20 or 30 miles? They don’t. And if that’s not enough, aside from Dallas, all these cities, including Tulsa and Oklahoma City, rank higher in climate than #43, Honolulu. Really?

So how did the metroplex fare?

(more…)

Cherry 1

Coinciding with cherry blossom season, I received a note from a reader in Japan (Candy covers the world!). The writer, an American school teacher is contemplating relocating back to the US in a couple of years. She’s specifically looking at midrise and highrise buildings in Dallas with a view. Her idea of “view” could be a tree-lined street or a sweeping panorama.

She’s never lived in Texas, but has relatives and friends in the Metroplex and San Antonio. This isn’t her first foray into remote-control real estate, having purchased a rental home in San Antonio during the depth of the housing crash. That said, she’s not keen to settle in San Antonio as “… it seems like one big suburb. At least Dallas has art, music, a real international airport, and restaurants beyond Olive Garden.”

Ouch.

(more…)

Photo: Lisa Long

Photo: Lisa Long

Lisa Long is a single mother and pottery teacher in Richardson ISD who recently decided to sell her three-bedroom Irving house after five years and move closer to work.

Long found herself in a situation emblematic of the fast-and-furious pace of the North Texas real estate market: Her house was on the market for 52 hours and in that time, she got 14 offers, ultimately selling for almost $10,000 above list, plus closing costs.

Great news, right? But Long was thinking the sale would take longer, and give her more time to decide where she and her five-year-old son Luke want to live. Long loves Dallas, but looking at the drive to Richardson, maybe something closer would make more sense. Also, she’s looking at a max budget of $150,000, which somewhat restricts her choices. Finally, properties are selling so fast, she’s got to move quickly if she wants to buy.

“There’s not a lot out there—it’s such a sellers market,” she said. “My dream house would be something small, not more than 1,300 square feet, because I don’t want to have to clean a lot. I’d also like two to three bedrooms, and I need a place to do pottery, like a garage, or studio outside that I could get dirty.”

Also on her wishlist:

  • A yard or community space for Luke
  • Good neighborhood where Luke can play with other children
  • Nearby park

Schools aren’t an issue, since Luke will be able to attend RISD (an awesome perk for teachers there).

We went virtual house hunting with Long and looked at what’s available in her price range that fits her needs and wants. We found four properties that seem to fit the bill.

(more…)

 

 moving

Moving can be a bummer for kids and families. Here are eight great tips to help ease the process of packing up.

By Karen Eubank
Special Contributor

Moving can be a traumatic time in the life of any child. Leaving the home they’ve grown up in or have important memories of, to head off for something unknown, is always tricky. House showings can be particularly stressful. Turning your home selling process into an adventure takes a little planning and some creative solutions. Here are a few tips that have worked wonders with kids who are reluctant to move or just a bit sad about change.

(more…)

Screen shot 2014-10-03 at 3.16.11 PM

We’ve been talking about this trend for some time, but thanks to the business-friendly environment Great State of Texas and our fantastic job market, more people are moving to our state from areas where there are fewer jobs and houses cost a whole lot more.

And of course, when more people relocate to Texas, that means more real estate clients. A total of 138,057 new clients according to the statistics from the Texas Association of Realtors’ “Texas Relocation Report.”

The report, which uses data from 2013 American Community Survey, the 2008-2012 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, as well as the U-Haul 2013 National Migration Trend Reports shows that Texas is outpacing Florida, California, Georgia, and North Carolina in the number of people moving from out of state.

(more…)