david stocker

The Sunnybrook Residence by architects David Stocker and Stephen Lohr of Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro. Photo: Nathan Schroder

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here). This column was originally posted on April 20. 

In Dallas, architect David Stocker, AIA, is well-known for his residential, commercial, and sacred spaces. He approaches his work theologically, he says, creating beauty in a broken world, one project at a time.

David Stocker

David Stocker, AIA

“I see beauty as largely objective—in a sense we are ‘hardwired’ to experience beauty,” Stocker said. “It is a common trait in our humanity. The creative process is really discovering, or in most cases re-discovering, these timeless patterns of what is known as beauty.”

He is a principal at Uptown-based Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects, a firm he co-founded with Mark Hoesterey and Enrique Montenegro almost 11 years ago. As the firm profile states, “We consider ourselves ordinary people who are extraordinarily good at our work. We care deeply about our craft and who it affects, and it is our desire to be always conscious of our design principles and core values, regardless of project type, scope, style, or location.”

Their portfolio on Houzz is a testament to the beauty they create. In fact, they’ve received the “Best of Houzz” design and service awards 2014-2015, and a design award this year. We sat down with Stocker and asked him about his background, philosophy, favorite projects, and more.

CandysDirt: You grew up in Central Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago. How did that influence you?

David Stocker: It gave me great access, at an early age, to the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Mies van der Rohe, and others and began my love of architecture. I began my move towards Texas by going to architecture school at the University of Arkansas. I was fortunate that E. Fay Jones was active at the school and professor at the time. I loved the school and the program (my daughter is attending now). I graduated in 1984 and decided to make Texas my home and begin my career at HKS [Architects].

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Richard Drummond Davis

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Richard Drummond Davis

Richard Drummond Davis

Dallas architect Richard Drummond Davis is Dallas born, creating some of the most lavish and beautiful luxury homes today in North Texas (he’s the architect behind our most recent Luxe Tour).

His undergraduate degrees, a BS in architectural studies and a liberal arts degree, at from the University of Texas at Austin. While earning his Masters degree in architecture at Princeton, Davis studied with Michael Graves, a member of the “White Five,” formerly a follower of Le Corbusier who turned post modern and invented a new style of architecture, totally and recognizably his own.

But post modern was not to be his path. Seeking to express his own ideas, he returned to Dallas to start his own firm, Richard Drummond Davis Architect. Today, Davis is masterful at listening to his clients and creating their dreams, while respecting the power and beauty of historical architectural forms.

CandysDirt.comWhat keeps you in architecture? What motivates you?

Richard Drummond Davis: I love the challenge of the client who wants something unique or the unusual site which demands something unique. Getting into the design challenge is an adrenaline high.

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Philip Newburn

The interior of the new microbrewery and taproom for HopFusion Ale Works, just south of downtown Fort Worth, designed by architect Philip Newburn. All photos: Philip Newburn

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

After a decade of practicing architecture in Fort Worth for acclaimed local offices, architect Philip Newburn’s passion for modern, sustainable architecture led him to branch out and start his own firm. He’s making a big splash, being recognized as one of the great young architects in North Texas.

philip newburn

Philip Newburn, AIA

“I love architecture that makes you think and I think modern architecture has that effect on a lot of people—it is good to reevaluate your opinions from time to time,” he said. “I also think that there is an inherent optimism when people set out to push boundaries and create something new, which is admirable.”

His degree is from the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, and he practices at his firm, Philip Newburn Architecture. We sat down with him to talk modern architecture, sustainable design, and more.

CandysDirt.com: Would you say you have an overarching design philosophy?

Philip Newburn: It’s almost too obvious to state, but the point of architecture should be to create meaningful, authentic, and beautiful spaces for humans and the communities in which they live. It is unfortunate that so much of our built environment seems to consistently fail at something as basic as this. I consider myself fortunate that every day I get to work with great clients in an effort to improve their quality of life and their communities.

 

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Stephen Arnn

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Stephen Arnn grew up surrounded by and appreciating great architecture. From an early age, he showed talent and interest in art, especially drawing. When his mother suggested he should be an architect when he grew up, the seven-year-old agreed, and from that point forward, Arnn had his career path in mind.

Stephen Arnn

Stephen Arnn

Today, he is a Dallas residential architectural designer, owner of Stephen Arnn Design, which he established in 1976. Arnn graduated from architecture school at Washington University in St. Louis and working at other boutique firms in Nebraska and Dallas.

“I became a different person [at Washington University] and I had a wonderful group of professors who challenged me,” he said. “It was easy in Oklahoma City to be known as talented—it wasn’t easy at Washington because there were a lot of talented people and I had to learn to use my talents and not just slough around.”

Arnn moved to Dallas after a stint in Nebraska at a large firm, joining Pierce Lacey Partnership and working six years with his mentor, Neal Lacey. Lacey taught him something valuable:

“He said, ‘You are in a profession where people tend to preen around each other and you should be in this profession to create beautiful buildings, buildings that work for the client…you’re not doing this to get published in Architectural Digest or Architectural Record—that is simply showing your work to your peers, your competition,” Arnn said. “I want to design a house that is exactly what the client wants, because it’s their money, not mine, and I want them to be embraced by the house and love it.”

We sat down with Arnn and talked shop.

CandysDirt: You’ve had a special gift since childhood that plays an important part in your career. Tell us about it. 

Stephen Arnn: A gift I was given, not one I developed out of education, is two fold: the ability to draw freehand, with a simple stroke, and the gift of seeing things in my head in three dimension. That makes the design process enormously easier. As well, the warmth of hand-drawn sketches or presentation drawings is much easier to sell than is a CAD drawing at this point in technological history. Hand drawings also allow me to be thinking about every stroke. It takes longer, at the inception, but it solves lots of problems later in the design development phase because it’s all been thought through.

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david stocker

The Sunnybrook Residence by architects David Stocker and Stephen Lohr of Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro. Photo: Nathan Schroder

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

In Dallas, architect David Stocker, AIA, is well-known for his residential, commercial, and sacred spaces. He approaches his work theologically, he says, creating beauty in a broken world, one project at a time.

David Stocker

David Stocker, AIA

“I see beauty as largely objective—in a sense we are ‘hardwired’ to experience beauty,” Stocker said. “It is a common trait in our humanity. The creative process is really discovering, or in most cases re-discovering, these timeless patterns of what is known as beauty.”

He is a principal at Uptown-based Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects, a firm he co-founded with Mark Hoesterey and Enrique Montenegro almost 11 years ago. As the firm profile states, “We consider ourselves ordinary people who are extraordinarily good at our work. We care deeply about our craft and who it affects, and it is our desire to be always conscious of our design principles and core values, regardless of project type, scope, style, or location.”

Their portfolio on Houzz is a testament to the beauty they create. In fact, they’ve received the “Best of Houzz” design and service awards 2014-2015, and a design award this year. We sat down with Stocker and asked him about his background, philosophy, favorite projects, and more.

CandysDirt: You grew up in Central Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago. How did that influence you?

David Stocker: It gave me great access, at an early age, to the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Mies van der Rohe, and others and began my love of architecture. I began my move towards Texas by going to architecture school at the University of Arkansas. I was fortunate that E. Fay Jones was active at the school and professor at the time. I loved the school and the program (my daughter is attending now). I graduated in 1984 and decided to make Texas my home and begin my career at HKS [Architects].

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jeffrey green

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Jeffrey L. Green sees artistry in a home renovation, finding “the potential in what is existing and breathing new life into a home that many might not consider salvageable.”

Jeffrey Green, AIA

Jeffrey Green, AIA

This is something he practices as Vice President of Architectural Interior Design and Construction Administrator at Dallas-based PBH Construction.

PBH Construction is his family’s business, and Green helped with many projects before joining in 2009. His design and build experience includes new constructions, rebuilds, and renovations of single-family and multi-family residential homes, as well as commercial, retail, and institutional spaces.

In addition to older homes, Green is passionate about older people—namely, helping them build or re-create their homes so they can age in place. This is a big topic in the architecture community now largely because of the 76.4 million Baby Boomers, the oldest of whom will turn 70 this year.

Green is a Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS), which makes him part of the growing dialogue on how to manage aging issues like a home’s livability for older Americans. He says this is just good design practice for all people.

“Ultimately, you want a home that is welcoming and accessible to all residents and guests,” Green said.

He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Architecture from Baylor University, and his Master of Architecture degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. While attending Baylor, Green completed a cooperative program, studying one year at Washington University’s Architectural Studio in St. Louis, Mo.

Green began his career with The Preston Partnership, LLC in Atlanta. He was responsible for site planning and due diligence, schematic design and graphic visualization, 2D- and 3D-rendering development, and more.

Green’s talent for design has earned him several recognitions, including a Rosser International Fellowship Award, a winner of the 2000-2001 Otis/ACSA International Student Design Competition in Istanbul, Turkey, and a Presidential Scholarship Award.

He answered eight questions from us about his work, trends in the architectural community, modern design, and Dallas. We learned a lot!

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Photo by Jeff Mitchell

Photo by Jeff Mitchell

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Adriana Meyer, AIA, was born in Guatemala City and attended architecture school at Universidad Francisco Marroquín, graduating in 1999.

Adriana Meyer, AIA

Adriana Meyer, AIA

She started working on residential projects while still a student, and began her career at HKS Architects in Dallas in 2000, specializing in healthcare and assisted living. Some of her projects included Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta; St. Rose Hospital, Las Vegas; Lynn Cancer Center, Boca Raton, amongst others. She worked on many aspects of these projects, but specialized in planning and exterior design.

In 2007, she founded her own firm, APM Architecture. Meyer designed modern homes throughout Texas, working in Dallas neighborhoods like Kessler Woods, Highland Park, Forest Hills, and Bluffview, as well as Central Texas’ Hill Country and Oklahoma.

All have the common thread of being environmentally conscious with a modern aesthetic. In recent years she has designed a warehouse conversion to mixed use in the Dallas Design District. She is expanding into the commercial and assisted living markets.

CandysDirt: Your first professional work with HKS had you specializing in healthcare and assisted living. What drew you to that firm and that kind of architecture? 

Adriana Meyer: I was drawn to a large firm environment for my first job in Dallas, because I wanted experience working on major projects and learn as much as possible. Healthcare was a great learning experience. I worked on planning and design. I quickly learned that focusing on how complex spaces are used, creates the best solutions. How to collaborate with a team and how to listen to clients were two of the most important lessons I learned.

I am still interested in those projects, even if my practice today is more residential/small commercial. One of the goals of APM architecture is expanding my team to allow me to work on larger projects, perhaps including healthcare in the future.

 

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alicia quintansIn our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Alicia Quintans

Alicia Chandler Quintans, AIA

Alicia Chandler Quintans, AIA, is an Oak Cliff-based architect, interior designer, and preservationist. She founded JQAQ Atelier in 2012, a small design firm focused on solving modern design challenges for residential and commercial projects.

She graduated from UT Arlington School of Architecture in 1991, where she met her husband Joel, a collaborative partner for JQAQ Atelier and the Creative Director for UTA.

The summer after graduating, they stayed at a professor friend’s home in Oak Cliff, and fell in love with this southern borough of Dallas. The couple found a small, 1947 minimal traditional house in Beckley Club Estates.

“After almost 25 years, the house has transformed into a laboratory for ideas,” Quintans said. “We’ve updated the kitchen and bath, installed energy-efficient features, and added a studio on the property to serve as a workshop and guesthouse. The property evolves to suit our needs and interests.”

She’s a board member of both Old Oak Cliff Conservation League and Preservation Dallas, actively assisting in educating and strengthening historic connections between local communities, neighborhoods, and the built environment.

“By learning the history and sharing stories of collective memory, we better understand the sense of place in our community and provide an emotional connection, represented in form by our built environment,” she said.

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